Judicial supervision of people who have offended

Researcher Michael Trood discusses insights from a systemic review and meta-analysis conducted with co-authors Ben Spivak and James Ogloff on judicial supervision. Therapeutic jurisprudence practice assumes that judicial officers can play an important role in improving the lives of people appearing before them. A key element in the therapeutic jurisprudence practice is the use of … Continue reading Judicial supervision of people who have offended

Overcoming Myopia in RJ and TJ

Today we have a blog from David Wexler and Stella Maris Margetic. Their blog was inspired by Prof. Tali Gal's superb editorial in the International Journal of Restorative Justice entitled, "Restorative Justice Myopia" (you can access the abstract here). Gal's point was that Restorative Justice (RJ) was myopic in its failure to look at its … Continue reading Overcoming Myopia in RJ and TJ

Psychopathy, Punishment, Racial Bias and Therapeutic Jurisprudence

Today we hear from Guest Bloggers Professor Michael Perlin and Alison Lynch. The two of us recently finished writing a law review article that explores a group of topics rarely covered by either legal or criminological research: the racial implications and neuroscientific questions surrounding the differences between sociopathy and psychopathy, and how those differences can … Continue reading Psychopathy, Punishment, Racial Bias and Therapeutic Jurisprudence

Restorative Justice and Therapeutic Jurisprudence in Forensic Cases – Perspectives of a Lawyer and a Psychologist

Professor Emeritus of Law New York Law School Michael Perlin and Psychologist Dr Valerie McClain explore whether Restorative Justice can be of value in criminal justice system in cases involving defendants with mental disabilities in a way that is consonant with Therapeutic Jurisprudence... Restorative justice (RJ) is a means by which to restore victims, restore … Continue reading Restorative Justice and Therapeutic Jurisprudence in Forensic Cases – Perspectives of a Lawyer and a Psychologist

“Clemency”, the movie, delivers a powerful therapeutic jurisprudence relevant message about the death penalty in America

Guest blogger David Yamada, Professor of Law at Suffolk University Law School in Boston and the founding board chair of the International Society for Therapeutic Jurisprudence, writes... At a 2009 TJ symposium hosted by Florida Coastal School of Law, professor and death penalty lawyer Cynthia Adcock presented a compelling talk about the anti-therapeutic impact of the death penalty on … Continue reading “Clemency”, the movie, delivers a powerful therapeutic jurisprudence relevant message about the death penalty in America