Can therapeutic jurisprudence improve family/child neglect/child protection courts?

Dr Vicki Lens explores how therapeutic jurisprudence principles might improve interactions between judges and child welfare caseworkers and produce better outcomes for children and families ... Much of the literature on therapeutic jurisprudence (T.J.) focuses on the targets of legal action.  Courtroom exchanges, though, are less a duet between a judge and a respondent or … Continue reading Can therapeutic jurisprudence improve family/child neglect/child protection courts?

The Trauma of the (Sexual Assault) Trial and its Inhospitable Rituals

In this blog Dr Elaine Craig, Associate Professor Dalhousie University - Schulich School of Law, Nova Scotia, Canada reflects on the rituals of criminal trials and explores whether Therapeutic jurisprudence (TJ) principles can make inhospitable trials hospitable... Despite decades of progressive law reforms to the criminal law and the rules of evidence, fear of the criminal … Continue reading The Trauma of the (Sexual Assault) Trial and its Inhospitable Rituals

Responsive judging 

Guest blogger Ann Marie Dewhurst, PhD, Registered Psychologist, reflects on a roundtable discussion - “Responsive Judging” - at the 2016 Law & Society Conference in New Orleans, USA. The panel of four judges included Kevin Burke (USA), Michael Jones(USA), Pauline Spencer (Australia) and Rick Verschoof (Nederland) was facilitated by Tania Sourdin (Dean of Law, University … Continue reading Responsive judging 

Five reasons why we need solution-focused approaches in courts

Guest blogger Michelle Edgely writes ... There are five cogent reasons why governments interested in evidence based policies should support solution-focused methods for dealing with drug-addicted and mentally impaired recidivist offenders in criminal courts: Rehabilitative sentencing is nothing new. Courts traditionally sentence offenders to achieve the balance appropriate to the case at hand of proportionate punishment, … Continue reading Five reasons why we need solution-focused approaches in courts

Improving judicial wellbeing – a new online resource 

Guest blogger Carly Scherver, Judicial Wellbeing Project Advisor, Judicial College of Victoria (Australia) writes... Judicial work is demanding and intense, and carries the potential for both great satisfaction and high stress. Acknowledging the reality of stress and building the capacity to manage it effectively, are important aspects of judging well. This is particularly true for … Continue reading Improving judicial wellbeing – a new online resource