Judicial supervision of people who have offended

Researcher Michael Trood discusses insights from a systemic review and meta-analysis conducted with co-authors Ben Spivak and James Ogloff on judicial supervision. Therapeutic jurisprudence practice assumes that judicial officers can play an important role in improving the lives of people appearing before them. A key element in the therapeutic jurisprudence practice is the use of … Continue reading Judicial supervision of people who have offended

Court Excellence and Therapeutic Jurisprudence

In this blog David B. Wexler, Honorary President of International Society for Therapeutic Jurisprudence discusses how the 3rd Edition of the International Framework for Court Excellence is a major advance for therapeutic jurisprudence. The international framework for court excellence The International Framework for Court Excellence was launched in 2008 by an international consortium from Europe, … Continue reading Court Excellence and Therapeutic Jurisprudence

Can therapeutic jurisprudence improve family/child neglect/child protection courts?

Dr Vicki Lens explores how therapeutic jurisprudence principles might improve interactions between judges and child welfare caseworkers and produce better outcomes for children and families ... Much of the literature on therapeutic jurisprudence (T.J.) focuses on the targets of legal action.  Courtroom exchanges, though, are less a duet between a judge and a respondent or … Continue reading Can therapeutic jurisprudence improve family/child neglect/child protection courts?

The Trauma of the (Sexual Assault) Trial and its Inhospitable Rituals

In this blog Dr Elaine Craig, Associate Professor Dalhousie University - Schulich School of Law, Nova Scotia, Canada reflects on the rituals of criminal trials and explores whether Therapeutic jurisprudence (TJ) principles can make inhospitable trials hospitable... Despite decades of progressive law reforms to the criminal law and the rules of evidence, fear of the criminal … Continue reading The Trauma of the (Sexual Assault) Trial and its Inhospitable Rituals

Responsive judging 

Guest blogger Ann Marie Dewhurst, PhD, Registered Psychologist, reflects on a roundtable discussion - “Responsive Judging” - at the 2016 Law & Society Conference in New Orleans, USA. The panel of four judges included Kevin Burke (USA), Michael Jones(USA), Pauline Spencer (Australia) and Rick Verschoof (Nederland) was facilitated by Tania Sourdin (Dean of Law, University … Continue reading Responsive judging