Psychopathy, Punishment, Racial Bias and Therapeutic Jurisprudence

Today we hear from Guest Bloggers Professor Michael Perlin and Alison Lynch. The two of us recently finished writing a law review article that explores a group of topics rarely covered by either legal or criminological research: the racial implications and neuroscientific questions surrounding the differences between sociopathy and psychopathy, and how those differences can … Continue reading Psychopathy, Punishment, Racial Bias and Therapeutic Jurisprudence

Talking about Therapeutic Jurisprudence (TJ) at Non-TJ conferences

Guest Blogger Professor Michael L. Perlin, New York Law School, explores how we can expand the reach of TJ and grow the worldwide TJ community... In 2019 I attended American Society of Criminology conference where I presented two TJ-related papers— “Man, I Ain’t No Judge”: The Therapeutic Jurisprudence Implications of the Use of Non-judicial Officers … Continue reading Talking about Therapeutic Jurisprudence (TJ) at Non-TJ conferences

AUSTRALIA’S FIRST RESEARCH MEASURING JUDICIAL STRESS: WHAT DOES IT MEAN FOR JUDICIAL OFFICERS AND THE COURTS?

The legal philosophy of Therapeutic Jurisprudence (TJ) invites us to examine how laws, legal processes and the roles of legal actors may be undertaken in a way to maximise wellbeing. We often reflect on the wellbeing of people coming before our courts, but what about the wellbeing of the presiding judicial officers? In this blog … Continue reading AUSTRALIA’S FIRST RESEARCH MEASURING JUDICIAL STRESS: WHAT DOES IT MEAN FOR JUDICIAL OFFICERS AND THE COURTS?