On Being Responsibly Bold (and other advice for TJ-Informed Change Agents)

Professor David Yamada writes... At a recent therapeutic jurisprudence (TJ) workshop hosted by Professor Carol Zeiner and the St. Thomas University School of Law in Miami, Florida, I urged us all to be “responsibly bold” in our research and advocacy for legal and policy change. The term resonated with a number of workshop participants, and … Continue reading On Being Responsibly Bold (and other advice for TJ-Informed Change Agents)

Join the International Society for Therapeutic Jurisprudence!

The International Society for Therapeutic Jurisprudence's website has gone public and you can now join as a member. Regular membership is $25, and student memberships are free. By joining the ISTJ, you will be able to: Participate and share your profile in the members-only TJ Forum; Join ISTJ chapters and interest groups; Submit your work for … Continue reading Join the International Society for Therapeutic Jurisprudence!

Three Kinds of Therapeutic Jurisprudence (and One Kind of Not-TJ)

Guest blogger Professor Emeritus of Law Michael Perlin writes... I am now home from a magical time in Prague (what a city!), having attended the biennial International Academy of Law and Mental Health Congress. I have missed only once since 1992, and this was, I thought, the best of all. Most days, I attended sessions … Continue reading Three Kinds of Therapeutic Jurisprudence (and One Kind of Not-TJ)

From Therapeutic Jurisprudence to Roper: When Social Science Serves as Authority in Law

Guest blogger Andrew Siske, Center for Families, Children and the Courts, Student Fellow (2016-2017) explores the role that social science can play in the law... Therapeutic jurisprudence (TJ), which can be defined as “the study of the role of law as a therapeutic agent.”[1] TJ represents a normative understanding of law which aims to identify the beneficial and … Continue reading From Therapeutic Jurisprudence to Roper: When Social Science Serves as Authority in Law

Chief Justice: Non-adversarial approaches in criminal and civil law essential to “effective justice”

At the recent Second International Conference on Non-adversarial Justice: integrating theory and practice The Honourable Wayne Martin AC Chief Justice of Western Australia noted the limitations  of a purely adversarial system and proposed  that development and expansion of the principles of non-adversarial justice is essential if the criminal and civil legal systems are to provide effective … Continue reading Chief Justice: Non-adversarial approaches in criminal and civil law essential to “effective justice”