Juvenile Justice and Mental Health: using the Sequential Intercept Model to reform the system

The Sequential Intercept Model (SIM) is a useful model when considering reform of the criminal justice system for people experiencing poor mental health.   See this earlier blog for a discussion of how SIM and therapeutic jurisprudence fit together. In short, SIM identifies five points of “interception” that include a person's: first contact with police … Continue reading Juvenile Justice and Mental Health: using the Sequential Intercept Model to reform the system

Glimmers of TJ hope in Australia’s north?

Guest bloggers Jared Sharp and Amelia Noble write about glimmers of therapeutic hope in the Northern Territory’s mass incarceration catastrophe[1]... The Northern Territory (Australia) is in the grips of an unparalled mass incarceration crisis. In September 2015, the NT imprisonment rate was 882 per 100,000 of the adult population.[2] This is four times the national average[3] … Continue reading Glimmers of TJ hope in Australia’s north?

New Wine in New Bottles: Using Therapeutic Jurisprudence to Reinvigorate Child Welfare Practice

Could a therapeutic jurisprudence themed conference be used in your area of the law or your local community to improve  your legal system? Guest blogger Professor Bernie Perlmutter talks about how a local community has used the lens of therapeutic jurisprudence to improve their frontline practice... The Miami-Dade Community Based Care Alliance, a forum for … Continue reading New Wine in New Bottles: Using Therapeutic Jurisprudence to Reinvigorate Child Welfare Practice

Mandatory sentencing – a TJ unfriendly bottle?

A Sentencing Advisory Council (Victoria, Australia) report on mandatory sentencing is a few years old now but still important given ongoing reliance on such laws in many jurisdictions. The paper examines the aims of mandatory sentencing and assesses whether the various schemes achieve those aims.  It also looks at the economic and social costs of mandatory … Continue reading Mandatory sentencing – a TJ unfriendly bottle?